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Securing Your State Of Mind: How To Get Free From Insecurity

Everyone is born with imperfections and these can become major insecurities for many people. This explains the prevalence of guides on how to make people feel good. Those who love reading beauty magazines might find this especially true. The ironic thing is that consumers’ insecurities are targeted in order to sell products.

Today, this can instill unhealthy thinking in young people who are still impressionable and lacking experience. If you’re a young adult who has mounting responsibilities, it’s best not to waste time with self-pity or feeling insecure about your body. Here are some tips to follow.

Get professional help.

There might be an undiagnosed mental health condition behind the thoughts of insecurity you have about your body. It’s best to seek help from a professional therapist who will help you ascertain this.

A popular example of body image-related conditions includes Body Dysmorphic Disorder, in which a person spends a long time thinking about his or her imperfections. While many of us do have little insecurities we think about at any given time, people with BDD might not control their thoughts almost all the time.

Studies show that BDD affects 1.7% to 2.4% of the general population, which means it affects about 1 in 50 people. Immediate consultation helps because the sooner you know if you have it or not, the sooner you’ll receive help in your daily routine.

Do a social media cleanse.

If your body image issues aren’t related to mental illness, you might look at external factors that cause you to feel bad about yourself. Maybe you’ve been subconsciously comparing yourself to other people on Instagram or a similar platform. In this case, you’ll benefit from a social media cleanse.

It’s no secret that social media affects perceptions of the self, especially among teenagers. Try to trim your list of people you follow to only your loved ones. This way, your online communication only involves them and wouldn’t stray into bouts of self-loathing.

Find ways to stay active.

It also helps to exercise or keep your body active. Research shows how fitness activities contribute to a happier state of mind as compared to leading a sedentary lifestyle. The latter refers to a daily routine in which a person just sits or lays at home without doing physical activities like walking outside or doing chores.

Today, there are several ways to get active whether on your own or with friends and family. You can jog around your neighborhood, hike a nearby trail, or swim in pools or at the beach.  If you have the means to, you can also sign up for gym classes that can give you access to dancing, weightlifting, yoga, and other forms of fitness.

An added benefit of doing physical activities is that it gives you the opportunity to go outdoors. Whether you’re going to a lake for swimming or going up a hill for trekking, you can refresh your senses by breathing in fresh air from your neighborhood and taking in natural sights that you might not see that often.

Mind what you eat and drink.

The foods and liquids you eat and drink will also help stir positive thinking. For one, studies show how cacao chocolate can shake off bad moods and protect against depression, provided you eat this in moderation due to its sugar content. Eggs (ideally organic and cage-free), have also been touted as packed with great brain or neurotransmitter-boosting nutrients like Vitamin B12 and Biotin.

Mushrooms have been observed to pack vitamin D, which helps against depression. In short, mind what you eat. Try to eat more greens and less fast food. A perk of this is the physical changes on your body due to a healthier diet.

Let your mind and body rest.

Getting rest is also key to having a more positive outlook. By getting sufficient sleep, you let your mind and body recharge for days ahead. This is crucial, especially when you consider how a lack of sleep induces fatigue which affects your performance.

Whether you’re a corporate professional or a college student, don’t make cramming a habit. Beyond a night’s sleep, you can also treat yourself to forms of relaxation such as a massage or even a few minutes of me-time. Pamper yourself with stretch mark cream, or massage your face with a moisturizer.

Practice positive language and self-talk.

Psychologists believe that positive self-talk helps someone cope with negative thoughts, which is often done in therapy. To start off, the therapist guides the affected person to identify the source of these negative thoughts. More often than not, these likely started as messages received during childhood. The person might have been told that they’ll “never amount to anything” and similar hurtful statements.

The sooner these messages are identified, the more time there is for improvement. A common exercise recommended in psychology is to write down the negative thoughts that dampen your efforts to get over your feelings of insecurity or depression. This might be hard in that you have to remember specific events you don’t want to, but it might prove helpful in the next steps.

After this, look for positive truths to each of these negative occurrences. An example of such a truth could be that, for a bad decision, the person chooses to accept and grow from the mistake. Instead of self-deception, positive self-talk is more akin to looking at your circumstances in your own way and not through negative influence.

Securing Your State Of Mind

With the anxieties of today, it’s not surprising for people to feel insecure about themselves. It’s recommended to stop comparing yourself to others on social media, to monitor your diet, and to engage in physical activity. While most of these tips can indeed help combat insecurity, it’s better to consult a professional if you have a mental health condition. This is crucial so that people won’t feel that their negative thoughts are being trivialized. So long as you focus on your own wellness, you can see how it betters your body and self-esteem.

Resources: Mental Health, Cleveland Clinic, Young Minds, ADAA, Elite Daily, Psychology Today

 

 

 

 

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